When a budget debate is underway, and some politicians try to cut taxes so that you and I can keep more of our money, the refrain from some in the media as well as certain politicians (who tend to be liberal — they liberally take our money in the form of taxes and liberally spend our money in the form of pork programs) is, “How are we going to pay for these tax cuts??” That’s the wrong question.

Nobody “pays” for tax cuts — it’s actually an absurdity.

If you spend everything you earn, and then lose some of your income, nobody would ask you, “How are you going to pay for your pay cut?” because it is recognized as not making any sense. Rather, someone might ask how you are going to pay your expenses due to your pay cut. It might seem like a minor quibble, but it really isn’t. Words are powerful! In skipping the step, and saying “pay for tax cuts,” it gives a powerful force to those who want to keep taking more of your money.

When you and I are faced with a reduction in income, what do we do? We economize. We reduce our expenses to match our income. Luxuries and non-necessary items are the first to go. You and I have to do this sometimes — why should our government (which is supposedly “we the people”) be so different? Why should the government continue to pay for luxuries and non-necessary items when revenue goes down, while you and I have to tighten our belts in order to make it?

In asking, “How are we going to pay for tax cuts?” it makes it sound as if the expenses are fixed and unalterable! How ridiculous! In any budget, there are only two sides to the equation: income and expenses. If my income goes down and I can’t get it back up, I have to cut my expenses. If the government’s income actually goes down due to cuts in tax rates (which is arguable), why do they act as if they cannot reduce their expenses? That’s just arrogance, pure and simple. It also smacks of immaturity — like the guy who is living on the edge (or even over the edge), but won’t give up his meals out or his unlimited cell phone usage or cable TV even if he can’t meet his bills. Or someone who buys a brand-new car that he can’t afford just because he likes it. Reminds me of a toddler — “But I want it!”

It’s time for some grown-ups to stand up and put the arrogant teenagers and toddlers that are currently in charge of our government back in their places, so that those who are mature (not necessarily old; just mature — able to say “no” and mean it) can run the government and get us back on the right path.

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